Races

Crawford and Bevilaqua win Albany Half Ironman, White Disqualified

Races

 

Tim Bradley

Guy Crawford and Kate Bevilaqua have taken out the inaugural Albany Half Ironman in Western Australia, but not without a slice of controversy, as South Australia’s Matthew White was disqualified for littering.

Men’s Race

In a sea-sawing contest, Guy Crawford, who was second over the finish-line, was declared the inaugural champion at the Albany Half Ironman after South Australian pro was formally disqualified by technical officials after the finish of the event.

White was handed a red card on the bike, but was told at the time by a technical official it was a warning. The Adelaide-based athlete then continued on the run working hard to hold off a fast-finishing Crawford. Five minutes after crossing the finish-line in first place, White was told he was in fact disqualified despite being allowed to finish the run.

Post-race White tweeted: “Copped a nice DQ for littering today at Albany after busting a lung for 4hrs! Win goes to king an queen of Albany @blue70guy [Guy Crawford] @katebevilaqua [Kate Bevilaqua].”

With White handed a DQ, Frenchman Simon Billeau and Leon Griffin were upgraded up the standings to second and third, respectively.

In a fantastic show of sportsmanship, Crawford was quick to credit White on Twitter for his big performance in Albany earlier today: “@MattyWhite77 sorry about the DQ mate, you got me fair and square today Tough tough day at the office ..#AlbanyHalf

The other story out of Albany was young Matty Burton made a great start to his new professional triathlon career, finishing fourth overall.

Women’s Race

In the women’s race, Kate Bevilaqua showed her class to take a convincing victory ahead of Rachel Smith and Alex Bailie, who crossed the line in second and third, respectively.

With splits of 27:38 for the swim, 2:34:39 for the bike and a 1:30:46 run, Bevilaqua was in a class of her own in Albany and was rewarded with a dominant wire-to-wire victory.

Bevilaqua’s finishing time of 4:33:03 saw her go around the inaugural course a few minutes quicker than some of the men’s elite athletes, and gave her a comfortable seven minute win over Smith.

Men’s Results

1. Guy Crawford (NZL) – 4:06:08

2. Simon Billeau (FRA) – 4:07:27

3. Leon Griffin – 4:09:42

4. Matt Burton – 4:15:20

5. Ryan Baugh – 4:19:09

Women’s Results

1. Kate Bevilaqua – 4:33:03

2. Rachel Smith  – 4:40:58

3. Alex Bailie – 4:54:14

4. Caroline Ashby – 5:01:44

5. Nathalie Laurendeau – 5:08:08

 

 

 

 

 

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  • pedro

    pedroso its okay for professionals to litter?

  • Southern

    Sounds a ridiculous penalty, but hopefully it makes event organisation and post race clean up a bit easier if rubbish is disposed f only in designated zones.

  • Dave

    It seems the issue is not whether littering itself is the issue, but more the confusion surrounding the way that the matter was dealt with by officials. If it’s in the rules that littering is an automatic DQ, then fine, that’s the way it is.

    To be told it was just a warning when it wasn’t so is very tough. Also to be allowed to race through to the end, and cross the line in first is wrong. No one wins from that situation. Not the fans, and not the pro’s. Guy gets a hollow feeling win, and Matty is left looking silly, when if he had been pulled off course at an appropriate time, then both athletes would have received a fair treatment.

    Instead, everyone gets ticked off, and there is another conversation going on about how inept the officiating is at triathlon events in Australia.

  • Ade

    Does anyone know more about what happened? Is it an automatic DQ, or had White had already received a warning? Seems a very harsh penalty if you don’t get a warning first, particularly given it’s not always easy to manage that stuff so you can drop it in the designated zone. (I might have to watch where I throw my banana skins if I could get DQed for it.)

    • Dennis

      Littering was an automatic DQ a this event. I believe he disposed of a Gel wrapper outside of the designated litter drop zone.

      Even though it was stated that littering was an automatic DQ I still saw a fair amount of litter around the course.

  • Rob

    It’s important to note that this was a well organised event (despite this controversy) which was enjoyed by many hundreds of participants and spectators. As far as I’m aware nobody has said that they won’t be back and I hope that the event goes from strength to strength.

  • Jordan Rapp

    Littering is an automatic DQ at most races because it’s a serious problem. In Penticton, where my wife and I live in the summer, the Ironman Canada organizers have had to work almost every year to ease tensions with the farmers in the Similkameen valley (the backside of the IMC course) because people throw trash in their fields. It’s one of the things that can really ruin a race’s reputation within a community, which is why the penalty is so strict.

    We had a good chat about it on Twitter. Paul Atard made the best suggestion – a time penalty on race day (instead of DQ) plus a MANDATORY 2hr clean-up shift post-race. I think that’s the way to do it.

    But littering is a real problem, and while I feel for Matty, there’s a reason that the rules need to be so strict.

  • Benno

    I thought that Kira Flanagan got third place in the women’s…? Where did she come in your book Tim?

    • Albanylocal

      She did indeed come 3rd Ben but as she raced age group she fell under that category rather than open. Great show Albany…true keeper.

  • thecyclingtranslator

    I’m a local roadie and I can tell you that organisazion of the race was first class – and the vibe here in Albany was terrific. If this doesn’t become one of THE events in the Australian racing calendar I’ll eat my skinsuit! I think this was a tough decision, and I’m in favour of the time penalty/mandatory clean up – sounds better. Nb. Great cycling scene here in Albany too, so plenty of competitors were talking about bringing the family next time and making a holiday of it.

  • thecyclingtranslator

    7 January 2013

    I’m a local roadie and I can tell you that organization of the race was first class – and the vibe here in Albany was terrific. If this doesn’t become one of THE events in the Australian racing calendar I’ll eat my skinsuit! I think this was a tough decision, and I’m in favour of the time penalty/mandatory clean up – sounds better. Nb. Great cycling scene here in Albany too, so plenty of competitors were talking about bringing the family next time and making a holiday of it.

  • Dennis

    I competed at the event and it was very clear in the race notes and at the briefing that deliberate littering out side of the designated areas was an automatic DQ.

    I agree that this does seem harsh but rules are rules. I hung onto a banana skin for about a kilometre until I reached the rubbish drop zone to ensure that I was not DQ’d.

  • Dean

    Even though he says dropping the bottle was an accident, it sounds he just continued on rather than stopping safely and retrieving it. I would assume doing that is not littering. But regardless of whether it’s an accident or not, leaving it behind is littering.

    Heck, I’ve seen those profile aero bottles lying in the middle of the road at a race.

  • TWA technical committee

    The WA technical committee have reviewd the DQ and the process by which it was served. The committe fully support the decision and appricate the mature acceptance by Mr White. They wish him success at future races here in WA where he has always been a welcome athlete. The officials thank all athletes for a clean race and commend the RD team for a successful inaugural event.
    TWA Technical Chair